Homecoming

A love I knew that flew away
While I grew up, returned today
And with him brought, to my surprise
A smile I knew, and two brown eyes,
A bubbling laugh, not from his chest,
But from his heart, you know the rest.
I could not see, though eyes were wide.
I don’t know why – perhaps I cried?
But glad I was, to find him thus:
So filled with joy, though not for us,
My black-heart-monster, ever grave,
Yawned and crawled back to his cave.
I loved him then, I love him still,
Yet find I bear him no ill will.
Despite the pain of losing you;
For he did what he had to do.
And now we’ve grown – how strange it seems;
This shadow once did haunt my dreams,
But he has gone, and in his wake
A moment’s silence I shall take.
To mourn his passing, shed my tears,
Look back fondly on the years.
Then put aside these wounds – now mild,
And join in laughter with his child.

A fairytale

A maiden fair did gaze one day
Into a well I heard her say
I shall not wish for silly things,
What good are princes? Diamond rings?
Instead, I ask for common sense;
The right to choose from this day hence:
What path I take, for good or ill,
And whether I go on the pill.
(This maiden fair was as you see
More sensible than you or me).
She begged the well then, on her knees
To grant her one last favour, please?
And my ears pricked to see what might
The girl choose now to ease her plight.
Dear reader, be you not amazed,
Though I was shocked, in quite a daze
At what next I heard issue forth
From that peculiar rosebud mouth:
She bid the well send her a gift,
Not tall or handsome, strong or swift,
But one which would (and I don’t err)
Next in life, be “good for her”.
So there I stood, struck dumb with awe
Wondering at what I saw:
A girl, though young and lithe of limb,
Choosing wisdom over sin.